This is a follow-up on my previous post about Dieric Bouts and the Coronation of the Virgin in the Vienna Museum.

I have only one book about Dieric Bouts specifically lying around, and it’s a catalogue rather than a complete overview of his work. The library has a book with his complete oeuvre but it is not available right now, so that’s something for later.

Even though copying and imitating other painters was extensively done and paintings were executed by ateliers rather than a single person, each painter still has a specific style. I associate Bouts’s human figures with rather stiff, fairly elongated characters and fairly frizzy hair.

When I came across a picture of the Coronation I was intrigued by the third angel on the left because it reminds me of Hugo and Jean Hey, who are of a later date. The painting does not seem to be in the catalogue I have here, but maybe it’s in the library book. Patience is needed.

In the meantime I’ve been going through a number of paintings by Dieric Bouts. I came across a Virgin located at Granada that contains angels similar to those on the Vienna painting. I don’t know which painting came first, though (should look it up at some point):.

Some of the angels resemble those on the Vienna piece closely.

Vienna:

Granada:

There is even straightforward copy paste work:

Vienna:

Granada:

Bouts is not very good at painting profiles. For instance on the Hippolyte painting, this figure looks rather clumsy:

Note that this painting was finished by Hugo van der Goes after the death of Bouts, and I’m not quite sure which bits he has done exactly. It’s interesting, in any case, that there is a direct link between Dieric Bouts and Hugo van der Goes.

This is what attracted my attention: the third angel on the Vienna Virgin:

Mirrored:

The posture and the face reminded me of the left of the two boys on the Monforte altarpiece by Hugo van der Goes (see earlier posts, nb):

Coincidence, no doubt, still interesting.