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The sword in the stone – update

Just did a page count of the old chronicles and biographies related to CtB I want to go through in the coming weeks: more than 8000 pages. I’ll have to be selective. The contemporary summaries and biographies are not useful. I am looking for very specific information.

Earlier today I checked the progress of the restauration works in the church of Bruges, to find out whether the tomb is visible right now or not, because I don’t want to undertake the long trip for nothing (but it’s not clear from the website – the Michelangelo statue will not be visible until March in any case). Not that it’s urgent or really matters, the skeleton is not underneath the tomb anyway.

I am busy with a little project for the painting course and wanted to find a view from above of the tomb of C (impossible, apparently). During my research I came across a site of the Palais ducal at Nancy with a lot of info on the tomb of C, which seems to have been updated today. It also has some info on the intestines (see earlier post), which were buried separately and where they were buried (near a statue of the Virgin). Also interesting is the suggestion, that the skeleton could still be somewhere buried in the soil of Nancy, if I understood correctly.

It looks like it’s turning into a Rennes-le-Château type of treasure hunt. However, I am not going to immediately rush to Nancy with a shovel in hand. This needs some planning.

For those interested, the link is this: Tombeau de Charles le Téméraire (Tomb of Charles the Bold)

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Not my ancestors: Philip the very, very Bad

[I see lots of people are doing posts about their ancestors. I thought it’d be cool to do some posts about people who are not my ancestors.]

Let’s start with Philip the Good for no reason at all.

Philip the Good (FrenchPhilippe le BonDutchFilips de Goede; 31 July 1396 – 15 June 1467) was Duke of Burgundy as Philip III from 1419 until his death. He was a member of a cadet line of the Valois dynasty, to which all the 15th-century kings of France belonged.

Philip was married for a third time to Isabella of Portugal, a daughter of John I of Portugal and Philippa of Lancaster, in Bruges on 7 January 1430.[4] This marriage produced four sons:

  • Anthony (September 30, 1430, Brussels – February 5, 1432, Brussels), Count of Charolais;
  • Josse (April 24, 1432 – aft. May 6, 1432), Count of Charolais;
  • Charles (10 November 1433 – 5 January 1477), Count of Charolais and Philip’s successor as Duke of Burgundy, known as “Charles the Bold” or “Charles the Rash”
  • Philip the very, very Bad (in French: Philippe le tres méchant – Dutch: Filips de hele Stoute) 

Valois were notorious for their madness and their big noses.

Recently discovered portrait by Rogier van der Weyden of Philip the Good with his fourth son, Philip the very, very Bad, about whom very little is known.

[Source: mostly Wikipedia]

Nb: This mashed up self-portrait will probably be my next painting.

Yours eternally,

Maugis the Bewitched

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Forward to the past

Hospices de Beaune – Picture from the family archives, AD many, many years ago. They were founded by Nicolas Rolin, chancellor to Philip the Good.  The hospices, not our archives, lol.

As you can see I have done a rollback of the site, up till July. I am trying to keep this site as clean as possible and it was getting very cluttered . I have gathered so much information now that I am going to reorganise it in a more structured way as pages,  under Documents & Background, including the relevant pictures. It will be password protected (password available upon request).

As for the art, we’ll see how and where it goes.

 

 

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Day 7: Albi

It’s too hot to paint, even for drawing almost. The past few days I’ve been working in my sketchbook, studies for the things I am working on or will start to work on next month. It’s too hot for Caravaggio as well, so that’s for next week. Today I went to pick up a Greek dude I bought in an auction but that’s also for another time. No WIP today, let’s first finish off the last two travel posts. I’ve switched day 6 and 7 around.

On Thursday we went to Albi, known for its ridiculously big brick cathedral. It’s too hot to write large amounts of text, so mostly images hereafter.

I gave up counting the bricks

I wonder how they painted that ceiling.

Looks a bit condescending, this angel

Nothing more uplifting on your wall than a giant apocalypse

Pool party medieval style

There’s people who cuddle cats and there are those other people

Rosy cheeked angel

Saint Cecilia, patron saint of the cathedral, with some relics

Not sure what this is and what happened down there

Monster, no longer in the closet

Lady in the portal with some graffiti on her feet. I was going to write a whole rant about how people have no respect for monument nowadays until I noticed the dates on the scribblings.

There is so much love for you in my heart. Wait, I’ll tear it out, so I can show you.

See you laters, alligators

And sorry, Jesus

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Day 5 (II): Penne – Masons & Mouse traps

After our visit to Cordes (see earlier post), we drove on to Penne, another small medieval village. The sight of the castle perched on the rock above the village is quite spectacular.

Again, the streets were narrow and steep so we left the car in the car park and climbed up towards the castle. Along the way we passed the St. Catherine church so we took a peek inside. Per usual, a very dark and medieval looking interior, almost a castle in itself.

The entrance to the church, photobombed by an unknown man.

The church interior

A dramatic head of Jesus and other religious paraphernalia, behind bars in one of the side chapels

Another head, this time above a door

Creative ash tray

Doll’s head in a mouse trap, quirky decoration on the door of a house, mostly interesting because I didn’t know there was a brand of mouse traps called Lucifer. 

Local hero Le terrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrible, some kind of activist and anarchist from what I gather (correct me if I’m wrong)

After paying the entrance fee (6 euros pp) we climbed even higher up towards the castle itself.

Info panel

As you can see, the castle is quite kaputt so it’s being restored

Taking a dump, medieval style

Hey, look who we got here: great great great great… uncle Charlemagne! (there is a saying all Europeans descend from Charlemagne – explains my carrot nose)

The medieval builders are part of the entertainment. They’re busy chiseling perfectly rectangular stones into less perfectly rectangular stones to repair walls.

Life before Fortnite

And with one last view of the castle, this post comes to an end: