Tag: Karel de Stoute

Your mother was a hamster!

Als voorbereiding op een werk was ik wat onderzoek aan het doen over François Villon, een misdadige dichter of dichtende misdadiger, uit het Frankrijk van de vijftiende eeuw. Toevallig kwam ik uit op een stomme film uit 1927 – The Beloved Rogue -, een redelijk gefingeerde biografie waarin Villon gespeeld wordt door John Barrymore. Het blijkt echter dat de personages Louis XI en Karel van Bourgondië ook een grote rol in de film spelen. De film is weer zo’n fijn jaren 20 geval van kartonnen decors, rare kleren, manliner en groteske overacting. Conrad Veidt is fantastisch als Louis. De film kan oa. bekeken worden op YouTube en archive.org. Hier zijn een paar van mijn favoriete beeldjes. Weer veel inspiratie opgedaan.

Lawson Butt als Charles the Bold
Conrad Veidt als Louis IX
John Barrymore als François Villon. In mijn ogen heeft hij hier een hoog Eric Idle-gehalte.
De damsel (nog niet) in distress
Een van de eindscenes met Charles in een harnas met glittersjaal, Louis met vettig haar en Villon die er nogal Johnny Weismuller-achtig uitziet in deze scene. Hij was net uit een kooi van een toren gehaald


Gaat dat zien, gaat dat zien!


Some WIP

Kleine update met WIP en zo.

Jacques uit de Bourgondische tijd blijft een raadsel. Jacques en zijn broedsels waren bekend genoeg om een hoofdstuk in een boek over oude families in Brabant te krijgen maar niet genoeg om er verder nog enige zinnige, niet-contradictorische informatie over te vinden. Het helpt ook niet dat de namen Jacques en Jean erg populair waren bij de Glimes, zodanig dat ze nummers kregen die wisselden naargelang hun eigendommen en vrouwen. Een fysieke kopie van het boek heb ik nog nergens kunnen traceren. De enige kleine aanwijzing die ik verder heb is dat zijn goederen en land na zijn dood in Leuven verdeeld werden, maar of dat klopt…

Voor de rest heb ik wat random schetsen in olieverf op dik aquarelpapier gemaakt, vaak met restjes verf op mijn palet. Freewheelen vooral. Een deel is wat experimenteren voor opdrachten van de academie.

Giuliano de’Medici, naar een oude buste van Verrocchio.
Nog een keer de Bold. Moet dringend aan dat paneel verderwerken.
HA HA HA, cultureel erfgoed verbourgondischt.
Nog wat mishandeld cultureel erfgoed
Een schreeuwende non, naar een oude Z/W foto


Just some WIP

I’m speechless after reading Minois’ biography, not because the end was so tragic but because I have literally lost my voice. I’m also still more or less immobile because of the pinched nerve. Haven’t done much painting the past couple days, too sick.

Art school: finished three paintings and am now making small studies for our next assignment.

At home I have done quite some work on Ilion and a bit on Nemrut Dagi but nothing about the van der Weyden copy of Charles the Bold, or Antoine or Oscar.

Painted a number of A4 size portraits. Started a small contemporary scene based on a picture of a larp game we hosted quite a while ago and started a large canvas freely based on a collage of silent movies. Been trying out several versions of Egidius. These are all first layers:

A4 study of Egidius
Erik, incapacitated while larping – 25x30cm – first layer
Monthléry – 60×80 – first layer in progress. Painting freely based on a collage of silent movie stills. I’m painting over Animo Inquieto, that one wasn’t going anywhere. Colours dried up a little murky and I still have to add most of the background.

The Sword in the Stone – Update (1/2)

Post in 2 installments. The weather is much better but I’m incapacitated by a cold and an upset stomach and a very stubborn pinched nerve which makes it very painful to move about. AARRRHGGHHH! Also battling scammers and spammers as usual.

Yesterday I went to the library to pick up some books for the rest of my quest. Unfortunately, due to the success of B Van Loo’s Burgundian book the once neglected Burgundian section was raided, including the book about Charles the Bold with the Burgunderbeute. Nevertheless I dragged three interesting books home. Bad pictures on purpose in the light of ‘fair use’.

Book one is about people in Burgundian times who wrote letters to ask for mercy regarding the punishment of their crimes. Checked the index and the B gets mentioned a lot. Haven’t read it yet.

Book two is just for fun. It’s about daily life in Burgundian times and it’s full of miniatures. I have become a huge fan of Loyset Liedet who was a comic artist ‘avant-la-lettre’. Not all drawings are by his hand but there quite a few, including many with men with mighty hats. Here are a few examples by various artists:

Cover of the book
Illustration for Roman de la Rose
Philip the Good pays a visit to the writer of the manuscript he’s commissioned. Look at the shoes and the spindly legs, the crazy clothes. And those hats.
Medieval Bathing house aka brothel. Eating and bathing was a thing in those days. But what I find most hilarious is that most of them kept their hats on LOLHAHAHA.

I finished Minois’ biography about Charles the Bold. To summarise:

It was fairly easy to read, even for a non-native speaker like me, with some ironic/witty remarks. The e-book had the additional advantage that it’s possible to look up words. The disadvantage is that once the software is no longer available the book is no longer accessible as with normal books. I am thinking about getting a physical copy of the book too.

The biography is well documented, especially the part about Neuss, Morat, Nancy etc, with small maps of the battlefields but there are also (quite big sometimes) gaps and some dubious timelines. I also encountered some mistakes/typos. Minois tries to psychoanalyse the Bold but that’s a hit and miss. The role of Anton is a little neglected, but not as much as in other documentation I’ve read so far.

Anyway, as I mentioned before, we probably think we’ve evolved but it seems not too much has changed since Burgundian times: useless wars, powercrazy billionaires, treason and deceit, raping and pillaging, random violence, taxes, etc. Just less forests to escape into. And not enough mighty hats.

End of part I.


The Sword in the Stone: Brugge II

The first thing I did was head towards the O.L.Vrouwkerk which is situated in the middle of Bruges. Restoration works have been going on for years and at the moment the chapel where the Madonna by Michelangelo is normally located is inaccessible so the sculpture is not on display, just a cast. There was a lot of noise and dust so the entrance fee for the ‘museum’ was only 2 Euro instead of 6.

Apart from the things mentioned above there is large altarpiece by van Orley, a few medieval tombs and some not so great paintings. Unless you’ve never seen the choir of an old church or are very into Michelangelo and the B & C°, its probably not worth getting a ticket for the ‘museum’ (flog me if you think I deserve it). The outside is not very spectacular either.

This is the church interior, the tombs are at the back, behind the grate in the middle.

Mary’s tomb dates from just some years after her death, around 1500. The B’s tomb is much newer, from the middle of the 16th century. In 1979, when restoration works were going on (yeah, it’s a local tradition), Mary’s coffin and skeleton were discovered by accident. It turns out, the tombs were moved during the course of the centuries.

They are now back in their original positions. An autopsy of the skeleton revealed that it matches the injuries Mary sustained when she fell of her horse during a hunting trip. She was only 25. There was a small box with her, which contained the heart of Philip II, her son, who died of an illness or poisoning at 28. Charles was killed/committed virtual suicide at Nancy at 43. That’s three generations of tragic deaths at a (relatively) young age. With that in mind, the wide open, staring eyes of the effigies, are rather creepy.

According to Wikipedia the coffin with her skeleton is visible but I couldn’t see it though I crawled around on my knees (it was very calm that day and hardly any visitors came by). There was a bad reflection on the glass, so maybe that’s why. I saw some pictures of the skeleton somewhere but I think it was in a library book.

Here are some pictures of her tomb. Unfortunately, because I’m on the short side, it turned out to be impossible to take picture from a above. Eg. for the first one I stood on my toes with my arm high up and it’s still not high enough.

Also according to Wikipedia, Charles the Bold was originally buried in the St. Donaas church, which was demolished later on. But somewhere else I read that when they brought his remains to Bruges, they put the casket in Mary’s tomb as a temporary solution, until there was room for him, so I’ll have to look into that. In any case, he’s not home. First of all, the skeleton has disappeared, maybe during a revolution when the church was pillaged and thrashed. Secondly, the bones, or at least the skull, that were brought to Bruges, were probably not his. His heart is probably still somewhere in the soil of Nancy.

Engraving of the tomb in its previous location:

The graves below:

Now if this is a real Carravaggio I’ll eat my hat:


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